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Going With the Flow

15 Jun

Personal Review: Journaled the desired outcome last night of an important meeting scheduled for today. Had some surprises along the way to the actual time of the meeting but stayed positive and refused to give in to defeatist thinking. Business Partner picked me up – just a tad late – and we were off to the designated place of meeting!

I sent a quick text off to my prospect, a friend, to let him know we were on the way. Then came the call in response. A crisis had developed presenting a fire that he had to put out. Very apologetic. Promised to call later. We turned around and came back.

As I walked into my apartment building, I weighed the events in terms of my personal desires. Then I started to consider the developments in terms of my friend’s dilemma and what it could mean in terms of some very important programs for which he was trying to get support.

Then it came to me. A very clear picture presented itself of how I might really be of service to this gentleman and provide him an alternative means of achieving his lofty goals. I clearly saw how I could be of service to him.

I shot off a quick text, knowing he would be on his way to a committee meeting, thanking him for his communication and letting him know that I hoped we would have the chance to speak or meet later as he had suggested in our brief conversation. Then I let him know that regardless of how things went this evening, I believed I had a solution.

I realized that I held an answer that might provide my friend a key to salvaging an otherwise dismal and potentially catastrophic development, affecting thousands of people who were depending on help from his programs. I filled with an appreciation of how all things work together for the ultimate good. I envisioned a scenario that strengthened his position and created an autonomy for his programs.

In his book, Change Your Thoughts, Change Your Life; Living the Wisdom of the Tao, Dr. Wayne Dyer speaks about “rearranging priorities to ensure contentment” in relationship to the 3rd verse of the Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu

“Practice not doing…

When action is pure and selfless,

Everything settles into its own perfect place.”

Thus Dyer’s interpretation of this translation of Verse 3 is that we are being told to trust The Source (God/Creator) and know that there is something much loftier than our egos driving our existence.

He also suggests replacing our personal desires with the simple but profound “Tao-centered question: How may I serve?”

I was anticipating this meeting for days because I had placed an importance of its outcome to my success. It was all about what it meant to me and my goals. But then I heard the panic in my friend’s voice as he spoke of possibly losing everything in regards to what he was trying to build. As I began searching for what I could take out of all this that was positive…that’s when it became evident that I had a way to help to minimize his pain.

Paradoxically, I feel more enthusiastic because it’s no longer about me. It’s about how I can be of service to my friend. I just had to sit and smile because it reminded me of the many times my  spiritual mentor and Elder, Grandmother Pa’Ris’Ha has shared with us the true way to happiness is through service to others.

“……. When man is strong enough to truly look at himself objectively, he will find it happened when he was totally involved in service to others.  This is when we remember and the question is answered of who and what we are.  Then and only then, can we see clearly and know Great Spirit.” -Pa’Ris’Ha Taylor*

* © 1994 Pa’Ris’Ha © Copyright 2007 Parisha Online. All Rights Reserved.

DISCLAIMER: All the opinions expressed in any articles, blog posts and Internet content written by me are my own and do not reflect the opinions or beliefs of any individuals or organizations with whom I associate.

©2011 Deborah Adler. All rights reserved. (NOTE: ALL quotes and/or materials from other authors or sources remain the sole property of the original authors/source.)

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Life as a Paradox

11 Mar

Definition: “something (such as a situation) that is made up of two opposite things and that seems impossible but is actually true or possible.”

I’m studying the Tao Te Ching. There are 81 verses. It’s possible to spend a lifetime studying these verses, which for the most part don’t have even twenty lines to them – but boy, do they nail Truth.

Of course, I can’t really explain what I’m reading, but when I read it there’s an innate recognition – I feel an “Ah-hah.” Somewhere deep in my Being, I recognize Mystery.

Paradox.  Know it, but can’t explain it. Recognize it, but never saw it before. I do know that when it starts talking about the Master Teacher, I recognize my spiritual mentor and Elder of 25 years, Grandmother Pa’Ris’Ha. It’s uncanny.

It seems the more we seek something the more it eludes us – whether it be prosperity, position, relationship – whatever. Perhaps it has to do with the Principle of Attraction.

When we concentrate our thoughts on what we don’t have – our focus is on what we lack. We give so much attention to that that we end up creating more lack.

Even when we’re carefully crafting goals in totally positive terms, if we’re concentrating on creating results, we are probably blocking our own success. We’ve become accustomed to plotting out the course to our goals. Quantum Physics tells us if we clearly define our beginning point and end point, the Universe will fill in the details. Another paradox.

“The Master leads

by emptying people’s minds

and filling their cores

by weakening their ambitions

and toughening their resolves…”*

There’s an old Chinese proverb about a Teacher and student. The teacher starts pouring tea into the student’s cup but continues pouring even as the tea overflows and pours all over the table. When the student questions why, the Teacher responds that the student’s mind is like the full cup of tea. The student has come to the Teacher pretty full of himself. Only when the student would be willing to let go of what he thought he knew, i.e. empty his mind, would the Teacher be able to work with him.

Recovery from addiction is a lot like that. We tend to walk in thinking we know what we need to do to “beat this thing” – and slowly we learn from the shared experiences of others present that in order to triumph over our addiction we need to “surrender,” form a partnership with the God of our understanding, and empty out what we think we know so we can really learn.

Another Paradox.

If my best thinking got me in a place of dire straights, it’s highly likely that only by building my core values will I transcend my predicament. Empty out in order to receive.

My ambition in life might be to rise to a particular position or status or income level – whatever – but only when I resolve to live a life of service will I achieve all that I want through helping others.

That’s not my wisdom. I’ve been hearing it from my Elder for 25 years, only to be reinforced in recovery rooms, by inspirational speakers and business motivators.

Now I’m reading it in the Tao.

I guess when we finally quit complicating life we find the simple solutions. If you find yourself thinking about something, “It can’t be that simple!” – you probably need an Ego check. Lose your self-importance and gain Wisdom.

Another Paradox…. 🙂

“The greatest discovery of all time is that a person can change his future by merely changing his attitude.” –Oprah Winfrey

“Allow each second of your time to be filled with a kindness to all and include yourself!” -Grandmother Pa’Ris’Ha

-Deborah Adler

*Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu

©2011 Deborah Adler. All rights reserved. (NOTE: All quotes remain the sole property of the original authors.)

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