Tag Archives: native

Urgent! Assistance For Hopi Traditional Elder Needed Now!

20 Aug

A Hopi Traditional Elder is in need of assistance. Her roof leaks and the walls are coming down. Windows are broken, making for hard winters. She is 86 and suffers from kidney disease.

Please help the volunteers who are currently on site making long-needed repairs. Donations of materials and funds are tax deductible. Fed. Tax ID Number 341635492.

Here is a partial list of what’s needed:

Stove, refrigerator, heater that runs on propane gas, wooden table and chairs (not metal due to electric storms).

Door, screen,

windows and screens,

paint,
plaster boards,

2×4’s for inside wall framing and ceiling,

floor cement,

tile remnants…

Materials donations from local building suppliers gratefully accepted. Please respond in the comments or email me through “Contact Me” so we can connect with you.

 

 

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The Easter Hat

23 Apr

“Family and friends are hidden treasures, seek them and enjoy their riches” –Dalai Lama

When I was in kindergarten I made an Easter Hat for my Mom. Of course, it was one of those wonderful paper-plate and crepe paper specials the likes of which can only come from a 5 or 6 year old. The materials may be simple, but in the eyes of the child, it is a beautiful creation made with love!

I rode the bus home, but on this particular day I happened to forget to tell the Driver to stop in front of my house. So at the corner of Dartmouth and Coolidge, he stopped and looked back at me. Reluctantly I got out, even though the corner where he opened the door to  was still not planted with any grass seed, so it was all mud.

The crepe paper ties slid down off the top of the hat and got muddied as I cried and walked my way back to my house in the middle of the block. As my Mom opened the door I was totally in tears because her beautiful Easter Hat Surprise was ruined.

She made a big fuss over it anyway, and tried to comfort me. I was as much upset over having missed my stop as having the walk in the mud, etc. Her soothing, loving voice caressed me and she took the Easter Hat into the kitchen.

With the kind of care that only a Mother can manage, she took a paper towel and wet it and squeezed the excess moisture out of it and then gently brushed the mud away from the crepe paper, leaving it intact. Considering how fragile crepe paper is – that was quite a fete!

With one of those “There – that’s all better now” proclamations only a Mother can pull off in spite of any diversity, she showed me the Easter Hat sparkling once again. She placed it on the dining room table to dry off and assured me it would be fine.

We didn’t really celebrate Easter in my house – at least not the Holy Day. Due to a mixed religious marriage and issues from my Dad’s side of the family, we didn’t really have religious observances. But Christmas was an annual journey to my Mom’s relatives in Easton, PA, where we spent the week celebrating with them, and Easter was a special day in our house where I got the traditional Easter Basket laden with candy and Mom, Dad and I all gave presents to each other.  We also ate off the “special dishes” at the dining room table, complete with linen tablecloth, with NO TV on. Beside each of our plates was a small “special occasion” wine glass with Manischewitz in it. This was the sole occasion of the year where wine was served. It was sort of our Springtime Christmas.

One Easter, much to my Dad’s chagrin, I got a live baby chick from our favorite pet store! (A surprise engineered by my Mom and me). Since my Mother had raised Bantam chickens as a girl, she helped me raise him – but that’s another story!

Happy Easter to all who celebrate it.

May the Holiday be a reminder to us of a Holy Observance of One who came to deliver a message of Love. My spiritual mentor and Elder, Grandmother Pa’Ris’Ha has often shared that Jesus is to the Heart what Buddha is to the Mind. Christhood and Buddha-hood together represent wholeness. May we all strive to be whole!  -Deborah Adler

Have a wonder-filled day and allow there to be much to be thankful for in your day. Touch others lives today in a service that will reward you and them in a good and helpful way. Harm no one and let truth be your solid ground. Create blessings in your life, live as God is!” –Grandmother Pa’Ris’Ha (A Seasonal Wonder!)*

© Copyright 2007 Parisha Online. All Rights Reserved.

DISCLAIMER: All the opinions expressed in any articles, blog posts and Internet content written by me are my own and do not reflect the opinions or beliefs of any individuals or organizations with whom I associate.

©2011 Deborah Adler. All rights reserved. (NOTE: ALL quotes and/or materials from other authors or sources remain the sole property of the original authors/source.)

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Earth Day 2011 and the Dangers of “Fracking”

22 Apr

“The earth is not only the common heritage of all humankind but also the ultimate source of life. By over-exploiting its resources we are undermining the very basis of our own life. All around, signs abound of the destruction caused by human activity and of the degradation of nature. Therefore, the protection and conservation of the earth is not a question of morality or ethics but a question of our survival. How we respond to this challenge will affect not only this generation but also many generations to come.”  -Dalai Lama (from his message Caring for the Earth)

I came across a report from ABC Nightline about earthquakes that have been experienced in the state of Arkansas which are suspected of being linked to the industrial practice of hydraulic fracturing or “fracking.”

I am including links here to the ABC Nightline website as well as the YouTube link, which I hope will not be removed under pressure from the Natural Gas Industry.

ABC NEWS NIGHTLINE – 4/21 – Fracking Connected to Earthquakes

http://youtu.be/pmqW7AQXMU8

Huffington Post Green: Earthquake in Arkansas

Here are just a few “highlights” from these and written reports from the internet:

Close to 1100 Earthquakes have been recorded since last September with the commencement of pumping of disposal water into the earth to prime natural gas wells, known as “Fracking,” in the Arkansas River Valley area.

Some have registered 2-3 on Richter Scale, some 4. There was a 4.7 magnitude quake in March. 

“Coincidentally” there has been a 50% reduction in earth quakes locally after the shut-down of two injection wells.

Here is the Google Results of seismic activity in Arkansas in just the last few days:

Recent earthquakes near Arkansas

Time

Magnitude

Location

3 days ago

3.3

Arkansas

Map

4 days ago

2.6

Arkansas

Map

6 days ago

3.0

Arkansas

Map

earthquake.usgs.gov

Here’s a map of today’s earthquake activity throughout the United States. That isolated cluster is Arkansas.

Today is Earth Day.  This official designation began forty-one years ago. Actually, every day is Earth Day because she, the Earth Mother, is our Home. Whether you refer to the Earth as a Planet, a Ship, a Living Entity, Mother – She is the ground we stand upon and the sphere we move through space upon encircling the Sun.

In the tradition of her Traditional Indigenous roots, the one I have known as a spiritual mentor and Elder, Grandmother Pa’Ris’Ha, speaks often of the importance of honoring the Earth Mother as a living Being. Indigenous Cultures know the importance of treating the Earth with Respect. Traditional Peoples Honor the Earth. There is a relationship of mutual survival. Where the Earth provides for us, we replenish.

We as a Society and most particularly as a country have bled the earth for oil, scrapped off her mountain tops for coal, gutted her forests for numerous purposes, poured noxious chemicals and gases into the air, dumped garbage and more chemicals into her waterways, and now we’re injecting waste water deep into bedrock to “loosen” natural gas to the surface through pipelines. These are acts of greed, raping and pillaging – not of respect.

The Earth is fully capable of providing for our needs. Abundance is a Principle. It’s even spoken of in the Bible (New Testament, King James Version).

“Luke 12: (24) Consider the ravens: for they neither sow nor reap; which neither have storehouse nor barn; and God feedeth them: how much more are ye better than the fowls?…(27)Consider the lilies how they grow: they toil not, they spin not; and yet I say unto you, that Solomon in all his glory was not arrayed like one of these.  (28)If then God so clothe the grass, which is to day in the field, and to morrow is cast into the oven; how much more will he clothe you, O ye of little faith?”

When we moved from being an agricultural society where each family unit was self-sustaining to an industrialized society which, like the assembly line, transformed us into segmented pieces where we depend on outside sources for the manufacture of our food, clothing and other necessities, we lost an essential relationship with the Earth Mother and the Elements.

Farmers still know this relationship. Their livelihood depends upon it. Our survival under this paradigm depends upon them. But we need to wake up. An attitude of Respect, conservation and preservation is required from all of us. We must form a collective consciousness to turn the tide of destruction. We are literally tearing apart our home underneath our feet.

Traditional Peoples hunt, fish, and grow crops with respect for the Earth as Provider. Only what is needed is taken. There is no manipulation or mauling of the natural resources that would endanger the natural order and balance of Creation. We operate as Co-Creators with Respect for Creator/Creation.

Given that our society has been and will continue to be industrialized and moving beyond into the technology-information phase, we cannot necessarily turn back to becoming an agricultural state. We can however become consciously aware of every action we take in the name of “self-preservation” and its effect upon all living Beings as well as the Mother Ship Herself.

There is no self-preservation without Respect for and preservation of our Home, the Earth.  -Deborah Adler

From “Grandmother’s Legacy” by Grandmother Pa’Ris’Ha

“I am so very grateful for the wisdom in the lifestyle of my Cherokee family. We refer to it simply as “The Way”. Nature is the oldest of our Elders and we know her well. She has birthed our Human Elders to give words to her ways. It is simple, but can be hard if we make it such or resist the authority that is its life giving power. We accept all has purpose within the Circle Of Life…

“To take only what we need and to not kill the Tree or Bush we take fruit and food from. To leave enough to reseed and living the principle of reincarnation and allow all life its course of existence was how we were given to live here. This is called the Sacred Hoop.”*

* © Copyright 2007 Parisha Online. All Rights Reserved.



DISCLAIMER: All the opinions expressed in any articles, blog posts and Internet content written by me are my own and do not reflect the opinions or beliefs of any individuals or organizations with whom I associate.

©2011 Deborah Adler. All rights reserved. (NOTE: ALL quotes and/or materials from other authors or sources remain the sole property of the original authors/source.)

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The Art of Listening

22 Mar

Listening – really listening to another person while they’re talking – requires that one’s attention is on the person who is speaking. Elementary, you say? Maybe. But in the past few days I’ve observed amongst a group of people with whom I do business on a regular basis the alarming lack of attention to the speaker. In fact, I’ve watched as people talk over another – as though they weren’t even there.

The best sales people are good listeners. The best salesperson is going to ask questions to find out their client’s needs and desires. The best salesperson is going to be dedicated to finding a way to fulfill those needs and desires in the best way possible. If you take good care of a client, they become a customer for life. If you don’t, they’ll most likely not be back.

Listening requires being present and paying attention to something outside of our own mind’s yama-yama.

I took part in an exercise years ago that involved pairing up with someone and looking into their eyes without saying anything. Taking turns as the Perceiver and the Seen, the goal of the exercise was to silently acknowledge the person we were looking into. The premise was that many people suffer from feelings of inadequacy because they weren’t “seen” at birth. Their arrival was not celebrated. So they move through their lives feeling starved for attention or missing something, or unworthy.

The exercise was powerful. Some cried. Others laughed. But the overall effect was profound. Some felt they had never been acknowledged as having importance, and this simply exercise offered a tremendous healing.

When we’re in conversation with another, it’s important to focus on that person. That’s true especially for children. How often does an adult pay partial attention to the child that trying so hard to get their attention? If their timing is bad, it’s okay to say “you’re interrupting right now” or some other appropriate direction without making the child wrong or bad. But then it’s important to come back around and give your undivided attention to that little person at some point and give validity to their need.

People crave being listened to. My mother used to grocery shop three times a week just to “visit” with the cashiers who knew her and always had a smile for her and asked about her dogs, and how were things going. They were genuinely interested in her, and it helped her to feel cared about.

The best gift we can give to another is our full attention, because that’s saying to them, “You’re important. What you have to say is important. I value you.”

The art of listening is just another aspect of Respect. In a world where too often people shout at each other without hearing what the other person is saying, we need to foster all the Respect we can, whenever and wherever we can.   -Deborah Adler

“Mutual respect is the foundation of genuine harmony. We should strive for a spirit of harmony, not for political or economic reasons, but rather simply because we realize the value of other traditions.” – Dalai Lama

“We are aware on all levels of our inner-actions with the Source Of All. We see it in Nature. The Seasons, the Sunrise and Sunset, the Winds, the Clouds, the Rains. Creator is in the cry of the newly born, and the scream of the Mother in birth. It is in our children’s laughter and our tears, in our songs and in our work. We see it in all the creatures that live in this world with us. We see it in all mankind. Where is God not?” –Grandmother’s Legacy by Pa’Ris’Ha*

*© Copyright 2002 Parisha. All Rights Reserved.  © Copyright 2007 Parisha Online. All Rights Reserved.

 

DISCLAIMER: All the opinions expressed in any articles, blog posts and Internet content written by me are my own and do not reflect the opinions or beliefs of any individuals or organizations with whom I associate.

©2011 Deborah Adler. All rights reserved. (NOTE: ALL quotes and/or materials from other authors or sources remain the sole property of the original authors/source.)

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Spring Forward

13 Mar

Amongst some of the more incredulously silly ideas humans have come up with is the notion that we can manipulate Time.

The logic behind “Daylight Savings Time” has been accredited to many things, not the least of which include giving Farmers an additional hour to work their fields, energy conservation and folks just wanting more “time” to enjoy sunny summer days.

Time itself, at least standardized regimented time, was a development of the railroad systems. Here’s a brief history from a California state energy site:

History of Daylight Saving Time

Daylight Saving Time is a change in the standard time of each time zone. Time zones were first used by the railroads in 1883 to standardize their schedules. According to the The Canadian Encyclopedia Plus by McClelland & Stewart Inc., Canada’s “[Sir Sandford] Fleming also played a key role in the development of a worldwide system of keeping time. Trains had made obsolete the old system where major cities and regions set clocks according to local astronomical conditions. Fleming advocated the adoption of a standard or mean time and hourly variations from that according to established time zones. He was instrumental in convening an International Prime Meridian Conference in Washington in 1884 at which the system of international standard time — still in use today — was adopted.”

In 1918, the U.S. Congress made the U.S. rail zones official under federal law and gave the responsibility to make any changes to the Interstate Commerce Commission, the only federal transportation regulatory agency at the time. When Congress created the Department of Transportation in 1966, it transferred the responsibility for the time laws to the new department.

The American law by which we turn our clock forward in the spring and back in the fall is known as the Uniform Time Act of 1966. The law does not require that anyone observe Daylight Saving Time; all the law says is that if we are going to observe Daylight Saving Time, it must be done uniformly.

Daylight Saving Time has been around for most of this century and even earlier.

Benjamin Franklin, while a minister to France, first suggested the idea in an essay titled “An Economical Project for Diminishing the Cost of Light.”

Time in the physical sense is a measurement. Manipulating a measurement is slightly arrogant. The idea that we humans can alter the laws of Physics or control the Sun borders on the absurd. It’s just about as silly as us thinking we can control the weather. (Although there is evidence that scientific technology exists and is being tested to “create” weather and geological events, and not necessarily to the benefit of the human population at large).

So “Spring Forward, Fall Back” is an annual ritual in the U.S. – and other countries – that allows us the illusion that we are in control of natural forces and Physics Principles.

Personally, I think this is more a reflection of how far removed we live from Nature. “Nature” is not something that we live isolated from, try as some of us may. Whether we acknowledge it or not, we humans exist in Nature. We are part of an eco-system, an environment called Planet Earth.

Grandmother Pa’Risha has often shared how traditional Indigenous Peoples live connected to the Earth and Nature. What may be surprising to some is that Indigenous Cultures possess the wisdom of science, mathematics, physics, etc. Understanding and living in harmony with the planet’s natural forces to hunt, raise crops, build many of the “natural wonders” of the world and live in abundance is a part of their Being. They understand and live as the Wheel of Life.

The further we grow away from our connection to nature, the natural forces and Principles through “civilization” we dull our senses and greatly curtail our quality of life. It’s a contradiction that is daunting. As we strive to improve the quality of life through technology, inventions and gadgets; the more we attempt to live by “convenience” and “comfort” – manipulating our environment, or even Time itself, the more we actually lose one of the greatest opportunities of Life itself – Living in Harmony with Creation.

Our time here affords us the opportunity to explore, know and celebrate the Mystery as One with Creation. We need to open ourselves to our connection with Nature, not isolate ourselves from it.

“Be in Nature, stay in harmony with Nature, it is you…Learn of Nature, then understand yourself!” Grandmother Pa’Ris’Ha

As has been evidenced by the devastating earthquake in Japan this week, there is no escaping the forces of Nature. But when we open ourselves to communicating with and being communicated to we can learn to hear her “messages” and have a greater awareness of when the Earth is clearing itself. With that knowledge we can live like the Indigenous Peoples still living traditionally around the world who, like the animals, birds, and fish, know when the Earth is relieving her stress through earthquakes, volcanoes, tsunamis or whatever and move to higher ground.

-Deborah Adler

“If you have your attention on what is see its fullness in every moment you will discover the dance of the divine in every leaf in every petal in every blade of grass in every rainbow in every rushing stream in every breath of every living being. …beyond memory and judgment lies the ocean of universal consciousness.”— Deepak Chopra


©2011 Deborah Adler. All rights reserved. (NOTE: All quotes remain the sole property of the original authors.)

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As the Mystery of Life Unfolds

12 Mar

As the Mystery of Life unfolds

We are the Creators/Observers of its Magnificence.

Sometimes the Natural Forces appear daunting

But then we realize that we are those Forces.

Where do I begin and you end?

Where does the air of the mountain divide

from the air of the plain?

How can we not see ourselves in Everyone

and everything around us…

For we are “Of God”

One with the All That Is,

We are Creator and Co-Creator.

We are the Mystery

and that which Observes

Itself.

-Deborah Adler

“Each of us is here to discover our true selves; that essentially we are spiritual beings who have taken manifestation in physical form; that we’re not human beings that have occasional spiritual experiences, that we’re spiritual beings that have occasional human experiences” –Deepak Chopra

“All around you no matter where you are is opportunity. You decide its potential and outcome. You are the co-creators. Make a life worthy of all the gifts we are. Love from a place empty of fear. Live in eternal celebration of being chosen for this world and life, and if we manage well, we will dwell in its glory and beauty again.” -Grandmother Pa’Ris’Ha


©2011 Deborah Adler. All rights reserved. (NOTE: All quotes remain the sole property of the original authors.)

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Life as a Paradox

11 Mar

Definition: “something (such as a situation) that is made up of two opposite things and that seems impossible but is actually true or possible.”

I’m studying the Tao Te Ching. There are 81 verses. It’s possible to spend a lifetime studying these verses, which for the most part don’t have even twenty lines to them – but boy, do they nail Truth.

Of course, I can’t really explain what I’m reading, but when I read it there’s an innate recognition – I feel an “Ah-hah.” Somewhere deep in my Being, I recognize Mystery.

Paradox.  Know it, but can’t explain it. Recognize it, but never saw it before. I do know that when it starts talking about the Master Teacher, I recognize my spiritual mentor and Elder of 25 years, Grandmother Pa’Ris’Ha. It’s uncanny.

It seems the more we seek something the more it eludes us – whether it be prosperity, position, relationship – whatever. Perhaps it has to do with the Principle of Attraction.

When we concentrate our thoughts on what we don’t have – our focus is on what we lack. We give so much attention to that that we end up creating more lack.

Even when we’re carefully crafting goals in totally positive terms, if we’re concentrating on creating results, we are probably blocking our own success. We’ve become accustomed to plotting out the course to our goals. Quantum Physics tells us if we clearly define our beginning point and end point, the Universe will fill in the details. Another paradox.

“The Master leads

by emptying people’s minds

and filling their cores

by weakening their ambitions

and toughening their resolves…”*

There’s an old Chinese proverb about a Teacher and student. The teacher starts pouring tea into the student’s cup but continues pouring even as the tea overflows and pours all over the table. When the student questions why, the Teacher responds that the student’s mind is like the full cup of tea. The student has come to the Teacher pretty full of himself. Only when the student would be willing to let go of what he thought he knew, i.e. empty his mind, would the Teacher be able to work with him.

Recovery from addiction is a lot like that. We tend to walk in thinking we know what we need to do to “beat this thing” – and slowly we learn from the shared experiences of others present that in order to triumph over our addiction we need to “surrender,” form a partnership with the God of our understanding, and empty out what we think we know so we can really learn.

Another Paradox.

If my best thinking got me in a place of dire straights, it’s highly likely that only by building my core values will I transcend my predicament. Empty out in order to receive.

My ambition in life might be to rise to a particular position or status or income level – whatever – but only when I resolve to live a life of service will I achieve all that I want through helping others.

That’s not my wisdom. I’ve been hearing it from my Elder for 25 years, only to be reinforced in recovery rooms, by inspirational speakers and business motivators.

Now I’m reading it in the Tao.

I guess when we finally quit complicating life we find the simple solutions. If you find yourself thinking about something, “It can’t be that simple!” – you probably need an Ego check. Lose your self-importance and gain Wisdom.

Another Paradox…. 🙂

“The greatest discovery of all time is that a person can change his future by merely changing his attitude.” –Oprah Winfrey

“Allow each second of your time to be filled with a kindness to all and include yourself!” -Grandmother Pa’Ris’Ha

-Deborah Adler

*Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu

©2011 Deborah Adler. All rights reserved. (NOTE: All quotes remain the sole property of the original authors.)

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